High Fructose Corn Syrup, or HFCS, is the inexpensive sweetener of choice for many large food manufacturers.  Companies who make HFCS have spent a lot of money on ad campaigns to convince the public that HFCS has the same effects on your body as sugar.  You may have seen ads like the one below starting a couple of years ago.
New research suggests that our bodies do metabolize HFCS differently than regular sugar.  Here are some reasons why it’s best to avoid this food-like item:

Weight Gain, Abdominal Fat.  Several research studies have shown that HFCS makes rats gain weight faster than table sugar.  In addition to the weight gain the (poor) rats had noticeably bigger bellies than their sugar-consuming friends.  This occurred in cases where each test group ate the same amount of total calories.  This means that the HFCS rats ate the same amount of calories as the other rats, yet they gained more weight.  This suggests that our bodies do process HFCS differently than sugar, and not in a good way!

Increased Heart Disease Risk.  A recent study done by the National Institute of Health found that HFCS could increase several risk factors for heart disease.  In a period of just two weeks, healthy young men and women who consumed 25% of their calories in HFCS experienced higher blood triglycerides and LDL cholesterol.

Increased hunger, decreased satiety.  Several animal studies have shown that rats will eat more calories if they are fed HFCS freely.  In one study from the Saint Louis University Liver Center rats that were fed HFCS ate 10% more calories, and weighed almost 50% more than other rats after 16 weeks.  These HFCS rats are really getting a bum deal!

We’ve discussed before how eating a “clean” diet with very few processed foods is best.  It’s easy to avoid HFCS if you choose to fill your plate with fresh produce, whole grains, and lean protein. 
10/4/2012 02:41:34 pm

Here's the research if anyone's interested:
http://ajpgi.physiology.org/content/295/5/G987.long
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3200248/
http://ebm.rsmjournals.com/content/234/6/651.long
http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S26/91/22K07/

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1/4/2013 06:13:54 pm

Commercially, fructose frequently is derived from sugar cane, sugar beets, and corn and there are three commercially important forms. Crystalline fructose is the monosaccharide, dried, ground, and of high purity. Thanks.

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Excellent and decent post. I found this much informative, as to what I was exactly searching for. Thanks for such post and please keep it up.

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9/26/2013 02:29:36 pm

Well, you won't have to convince me any further after reading this post! I have heard this and that about high fructose corn syrup, but I was interested in seeing what you had to say about it (I respect your opinion). Oh and thanks for taking the extra step and sharing the links to those research studies.

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